UK medicine

Medicine in UK – FAQs

Here are the common FAQs Quintessential Medicine Tutors have kindly compiled for our Pre-U students 🙂

  • Deadlines
  • Top UK schools
  • Requirements
  • Deferrment policy
  • BMAT
  • UKCAT
  • Essay Practice
  • Referee
  • Interview practice
  • Submission help
  • Matriculation Tip

Deadlines

  • 15 October, 18:00 (UK time)– any course at the universities of Oxford and Cambridge, or for most courses in medicine, veterinary medicine/science and dentistry
  • Only four medical schools out of five choices
  • Oxford or Cambridge, cannot choose both

 

Top UK schools

UK Top Medical Schools

ALL universities now unfortunately require the UKCAT or BMAT as of 2016.

Deferrment policy

  • If you decide to delay your studies you can still apply now and defer your start date by a year.
  • This way you can get your results confirmed and hopefully receive an unconditional offer for the following year.
  • If you’re applying for deferred entry in 2016 you need to meet offer conditions by 31 August 2015.

BMAT

  • 2-hour, pen-and-paper test divided into 3 sections
  • Aptitude and Skills (Generic skills in problem solving, understanding arguments, and data analysis and inference. (35MCQ, 60mins)
  • Scientific Knowledge and Applications (The ability to apply scientific knowledge typically covered in school Science and Mathematics by the age of 16 (27 MCQ,30min)
  • Section 3: Writing Task (The ability to select, develop and organise ideas, and to communicate them in writing, concisely and effectively. 1 essay, 30min )
  • Registration deadline 15 Oct Test date 4 Nov, results release 25 nov, no carryover of results
  • How to study: BMAT website, official guide

UKCAT

  • Test period: 1st July to 6 Oct, test dates are weekly, result released on the spot
  • Verbal Reasoning (-Assesses ability to critically evaluate information that is presented in a written form (44MCQ-22m)
  • Quantitative Reasoning (Assesses ability to critically evaluate information presented in a numerical form 36MCQ, 25m)
  • Abstract Reasoning (Assesses the use of convergent and divergent thinking to infer relationships from information, 55MCQ, 14m)
  • Decision Analysis (Assesses the ability to make sound decisions and judgements using complex information, 28mcq, 32m)
  • Situational Judgement (Measures capacity to understand real world situations and to identify critical factors and appropriate behaviour in dealing with them, 68MCQ, 27min)
  • How to study: UKCAT website, Kaplan

Difference between BMAT and UKCAT

  • BMAT is more sciencey, aptitude
  • UKCAT is more medical, wide range of academic, ethics, situational judgement
  • The BMAT as well as UKCAT are taken only once every year; you can’t retake it after you’ve taken if for an application cycle. If you are applying again the following year (e.g. you didn’t get in), then you will need to retake them. The scores are only valid for a single application cycle
  • all results under your name are sent to the universities automatically by the exam provider.

UCAS Essay

Referees

  • Very important, only 1 is needed
  • Generally includes predicted grades, any obstacles they’ve had to face, and their potential and motivation,
  • Why they’re suited to their chosen subject and career path, plus their attitude, motivation and commitment.
  • Skills and qualities like aptitude and enthusiasm, plus current or past achievements that will help with their chosen subject area.
  • Achievements, work experience, and extracurricular activities that relate to their chosen course(s).
  • Any factors/personal circumstances that might affect their performance (consent must be gained first to mention health or disabilities).

Submission Help

Get an expert to vet and handle your submission. Don’t risk it.

Interview Practice

  • Why do interviews go badly:
    • It said “ I had little evidence of caring work experience” “didn’t seem to understand the course” and “struggled to explain what I learnt from work experience”. Yes, my interview went pretty badly.
    • More prestigious schools tend to ask more complex basic science questions also
  • Moral of story is you really need to practice being sharp at interviews!

Matriculation Tip

  • Students have been known to save up their leave to enable them to start school on 2nd year of NS (e.g: graduate 2015, start school 2017)
  • Matriculation period is early-mid October
ukcat

Medicine in UK – UKCAT

UKCAT Guide

Our friendly medicine tutors would like to share more about the UKCAT. So where are the resources? Apart from individualized lessons,  you need to know about all the available resources for UKCAT

UKCAT

  • Test period: 1st July to 6 Oct, test dates are weekly, result released on the spot
  • Verbal Reasoning (-Assesses ability to critically evaluate information that is presented in a written form (44MCQ-22m)
  • Quantitative Reasoning (Assesses ability to critically evaluate information presented in a numerical form 36MCQ, 25m)
  • Abstract Reasoning (Assesses the use of convergent and divergent thinking to infer relationships from information, 55MCQ, 14m)
  • Decision Analysis (Assesses the ability to make sound decisions and judgements using complex information, 28mcq, 32m)
  • Situational Judgement (Measures capacity to understand real world situations and to identify critical factors and appropriate behaviour in dealing with them, 68MCQ, 27min)

 

Study from:

1)http://www.kaptest.co.uk/ukcat/plus

This will cost 60 pounds

2) http://www.kaptest.co.uk/ukcat/self-study

This will cost 155 pounds.

3)UKCAT Iphone practice app

https://itunes.apple.com/gb/app/ukcat-official/id642347722?mt=8

4) UKCAT Practices

http://practice.ukcat.ac.uk/pages/menu.aspx?pack=2a35c9e1-ef11-449f-9762-3d5a3692550f

Main tips:

  1. is to understand the concepts, if you get something wrong, make sure you correct the concept, not just knowing the answer for the sake of memorizing as questions may not be repeated.
  2. Practice practice practice

If you’re still not confident, further practices:

http://www.themedicportal.com/e-learning/ukcat/

http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki/UKCAT

https://www.medify.co.uk/ukcat-online-course

http://www.blackstonetutors.co.uk/free-ukcat-practice-questions.html

Must know from official UKCAT website: 

1)UKCAT official guide

http://www.ukcat.ac.uk/App_Media/uploads/guide-2015/UKCAT_Guide_15.html#p=1

2)UKCAT video guide

http://www.ukcat.ac.uk/app_media/uploads/ukcat-tutorial/story.html

3)Computer interface familiarization with UKCAT

http://www.ukcat.ac.uk/tour/

 

Good student website forums:

http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/wiki/UKCAT

http://www.thestudentroom.co.uk/showthread.php?t=1736183

Duke Medicine

US Universities – Part 1 (Duke)

Duke University FAQs

University:
Duke University

Subject studied:
Engineering, Economics

What subjects did you do at IB/A levels and what were your CCAs?
Subjects: Math, Physics, Chemistry, Biology, 2 ‘S’ Papers
CCAs: Students Council

How does the workload of universitiy compare with IB/A levels?

Comparable; you can choose your own pace.

How did you decided on this final university?
The flexibility and breadth of education afforded by the US system appealed to me. Duke has a great combination of a strong engineering school & reputable economics department.

What are the cost of living and cost of school fees for the entire duration of the degree?
Cost of living in North Carolina isn’t too high. Do budget for about USD $10,000 to USD $15,000 a year for room and board. Typically, tuition fees will come to around USD $45,000 to USD $50,000 a year.

How do teaching and learning work in your school? Are the faculty accessible?
Teaching is conducted through a combination of classroom lectures, discussions, lab work (for science & engineering), & field work. While students are given the latitude to perform self-directed learning, numerous opportunities are available for collaborative work. Faculty are accessible, and are willing to engage students.

How large are your courses?

Varies; small discussion-based classes may have 10 students or less, while introductory courses (e.g. Introduction to Economics) may have up to 400 students.

Are people very competitive academically? How many exams are there in a year? What happens if one fails the year?

There’s a healthy, collaborative spirit with regard to academics. In the US system, there’s typically a final exam for each course at the end of the semester, with about 1 to 2 midterm exams scattered during the semester.
It’s possible to repeat courses, with the permission of the Academic Dean.

How would you describe the school culture?
The Duke spirit is really strong. Duke isn’t located in a big city, and it makes campus life that much more vibrant. Sports like basketball, and to a smaller extent, football, are big at Duke.

Is there an established Singaporean presence at your university? How many Singaporeans are there per batch?
Yes there is. We have a reasonably-sized Singaporean community, and a Singapore Students Association. There are about 10 Singaporeans per batch.

How are international freshmen/freshers welcomed to your university?
There’s an International Students’ Orientation and a freshman orientation program. Freshmen are housed in freshmen-only dorms within East Campus. This is helpful in letting you get to know members of your class. Many of my closest friends at Duke were from my freshmen dorm.

Is your school “cliquey”?
To some extent. Greek life (e.g. fraternities & sororities) is rather popular. Certain groups of international students tend to form cliques. In general, however, Dukies are a bunch of approachable & friendly people.

Do people tend to hang among people of their own major/course/social class/race/nationality only, or is there a high degree of integration?
There is a good degree of integration. Due to the first-year housing arrangement and flexibility in course arrangements, there are numerous opportunities to meet people & find a group that you’re comfortable with. My freshman year hall-mates got along well, and we decided to live in the same cluster all the way through senior year. Among us, we had English majors, pre-meds, engineers, Caucasians, American-born Indians, Singaporeans – we were certainly a diverse bunch. Nonetheless, there are, as with many Ivies, rather ‘exclusive’ fraternities where people of a particular race / social class tend to gravitate towards.

What do students normally do in their spare time? Have you joined any extracurriculars? How do you find them?
I joined the motorsports team for a year, and was active in our SSA, helming it for a year. There are dedicated events for students to learn about the different extracurriculars on campus. Apart from extracurriculars, students can do lots in their spare time – attend campus events (theater / performances), socials, parties, go off-campus, explore the beautiful surroundings. During breaks, many of us venture beyond NC and travel around the US & beyond.

How would you rate the following “scenes” in your college and its surroundings: shopping, drinking, clubbing, fine arts, and sports?
Shopping – Not very active, although online shopping is very prevalent. There are very decent malls nearby (e.g. Southpoint mall).
Drinking – Active (on-campus & off). There are some pretty good bars in downtown Durham, near the American Tobacco campus. The legal drinking age is 21 and this is strictly enforced in Durham. Nonetheless, authorities provide students with reasonable leeway to hold parties on campus as long as things don’t get too rowdy.
Clubbing – Active. Don’t expect something like Zouk / Butter Factory though; the most popular club for Dukies, Shooters’, is more of a country-style establishment. Definitely not what we’d call classy.
Fine Arts – Active. The arts & theater scene is strong at Duke. The DPAC (Durham Performing Arts Center) is the largest theater in the Carolinas. It’s a beautiful establishment located in downtown Durham, just a 10 min drive away from Campus, and plays host to Broadway productions, high-profile concerts, recitals & comedy events.
Sports – Very active. Pretty much everyone is a Duke basketball fan. The Cameron Crazies, as they are called, are the most spirited in the country.

How’s the accommodation? Do most people stay in college dorms/halls, or independently? How should one look for accommodation?

Most people stay in college dorms & halls. There’s an annual on-campus housing lottery. On-campus housing is guaranteed for freshmen on East Campus.

How is the transport like? Does one need a car? If so, how should one go about getting a car?
There are free shuttle buses that ply the major routes around campus. A car isn’t necessary; if you need to take a quick trip or run errands, car-sharing services like Zipcar are available. A number of my American housemates had a car, and we could run errands together.

Is Asian food readily available? If one is to cook, where can we get the Asian food from?
Yes, there are nearby Asian supermarkets that cater to a sizeable Asian population in the Triangle region.

Do most people cook, eat at a catered facility or cafeteria, or eat out? How’s the catered food?
Most people eat at on-campus cafeterias. Portions, as with the rest of the US, are large. There’s a good variety of options, and many nearby delis and cafes do food deliveries to campus. It’s possible to cook if you’re living on Central Campus, an option open to Juniors & Seniors.

What are the laundry arrangements like?
On-campus laundry rooms are available, and are well-maintained.

Is it easy to find places of worship?
Yes; do get in touch with the various religious organizations on campus. The Duke Chapel is a great piece of architecture.

Do you think Singaporeans will experience a major culture shock?
No. Things aren’t that different in the US. For one, language isn’t a problem, people are pretty chill about things.

Do you ever feel peer pressure to do something you’re uncomfortable with?
No, Dukies tend to be respectful of each other’s values & practices.

Do you think that there might be any groups which might feel uncomfortable or marginalized at your school?
Duke is sometimes perceived to have a ‘rich, white-boy’ image. There has, in recent years, been much discourse to reinforce the importance of inclusiveness, after a couple of incidents where African-American students were abused with racial slurs.

What’s the best experience you’ve had so far in college?
Tenting with 11 other Cameron Crazies to get front-row tickets for the basketball game against our arch-rivals, the North Carolina Tar Heels, in 2009. That involved living in a tent outside the basketball stadium for a month, in the middle of winter. That was great for bonding & forging camaraderie through the pursuit of this common goal – to survive that period.

 

 

Glasgow Medicine

Medicine – Part 1 (Glasgow Medicine)

Glasgow Medicine FAQs

University: University of Glasgow

Course: 5-year medical degree (MBChB)

What subjects did you do at IB/A levels and what were your CCAs?

I did Triple Science in Hwa Chong Junior College – Physics, Biology, Chemistry and Advanced Mathematics; and my CCAs included Basketball, the Health and Fitness Club, as well being a CIP ambassador helping underprivileged children.

How does the workload of universitiy compare with IB/A levels?

You have much more control of your time in University compared to A levels. My course was a problem-based-learning (PBL) one, meaning that you have to be in charge of your own learning as classes were on average 3-5 hours per day, as compared to 8-10 hours that you usually spend in Junior College. This ensures that you develop independence and critical thinking during the course of study.

How did you decided on this final university?

Glasgow is internationally renowned for medicine, with many of the notable physicians coming from this school. This includes Joseph Lister, Pioneer of antiseptics and antibiotics; Ian Macdonald, obstetrician, and inventor of medical ultrasound); and Professor Harry Burns, to name a few.

What are the cost of living and cost of school fees for the entire duration of the degree?

During my year, the fees were set at 19,600 pounds per year (not subject to inflation).

The cost of living, including accommodation entertainment and travel is estimated to be 6,500 pounds in my year in 2011

How do teaching and learning work in your school? Are the faculty accessible?

As mentioned, mine was a PBL course. This allows students to brainstorm over particular topics in anatomy/physiology/pathology/biochemistry which have clinical relevance over the first three years, being facilitated by faculty. Over the last two years, the time is spend in a clinical setting within the Glasgow Hospitals. Yes the faculty are very approachable and you have various advisors in the school.

How large are your courses?

250 students, roughly 50 are international.

Are people very competitive academically? How many exams are there in a year? What happens if one fails the year?

Yes, all medical students are very competitive. This is the same in Scotland. There is usually only one final examination at the end of the academic year. However, elective and special study modules have their own separate tests.
You have a chance to retake the exam (supplementary exam). If you fail that, you get retained.

How would you describe the school culture?

Friendly, research oriented, and enriching.

Is there an established Singaporean presence at your university? How many Singaporeans are there per batch?

There is a modest presence. 8 students in my batch. Varies from 6-10.

How are freshmen/freshers welcomed to your university?

More than 7,000 across the various faculties

How are international freshmen/freshers welcomed to your university?

You are free to join freshers’ week which is a week long orientation program. There are various other clubs/societies which will make you feel welcome

Is your school “cliquey”?

Not really. Having said that, some Asians do like to mix only with Asians.

Do people tend to hang among people of their own major/course/social class/race/nationality only, or is there a high degree of integration?

I integrated particularly well with Scottish, Polish, Malaysian and English students. I can’t say the same for every other International student.

What do students normally do in their spare time? Have you joined any extracurriculars? How do you find them?

Scottish people love hanging out in the pubs drinking and watching football. I partook in this activity occasionally. Yes, I joined the Medics Basketball club. You can find more details on the University webpage.

How would you rate the following “scenes” in your college and its surroundings: shopping, drinking, clubbing, fine arts, and sports?

Shopping: 8/10 Drinking 9/10 Clubbing 6/10 Fine arts 9/10 Sports 9/10

How’s the accommodation? Do most people stay in college dorms/halls, or independently? How should one look for accommodation?

You have a wide range of choices from University based accommodation (I stayed at Cairncross House and Kelvinhaugh Gate); private accommodation (flats or houses) or hospital accommodation. The University webpage would be the best first place to look for. A simple google search would suffice.

 

How is the transport like? Does one need a car? If so, how should one go about getting a car?

Subway is the main way people get around. You can get a cheap car for less than 5000 dollars (second hand). Check on Glasgow gumtree, there are good prices on second hand cars there.

Is Asian food readily available? If one is to cook, where can we get the Asian food from?

Yes. A particularly good restaurant is Asia Style. If you want to cook, buy groceries from Morrisons. They have a good supply there

Do most people cook, eat at a catered facility or cafeteria, or eat out? How’s the catered food?

They usually eat out. I was not at a catered hall so I cannot comment. From what my friends have mentioned, Wolfson Hall (the only catered hall) serves pretty decent food.

What are the laundry arrangements like?

50 cents per wash in the Uni halls. You have to check the private ones yourself as I did not use them.

Is it easy to find places of worship?

Yes, Turnbull Catholic Hall was where I worshipped. There are various other organizations throughout the University which you can find places of worship including Buddhist, Taoist, Christian, Anglican etc.

Do you think Singaporeans will experience a major culture shock?

Nope. Its very easy to integrate in Scotland.

Do you ever feel peer pressure to do something you’re uncomfortable with?

Nope. I’m in control of my own life.

Do you think that there might be any groups which might feel uncomfortable or marginalized at your school?

Unless you are antisocial and unpleasant, No.

What’s the best experience you’ve had so far in college?

As the Glasgow Medic Basketball team, we travelled to Dundee and won the basketball competition there!

Is there anything that you wish you knew before leaving?

Perhaps to meet up more with seniors from the school to get a better idea about life, and make friends prior to starting school

Any final things you’d like to tell Singaporeans about your school?

Glasgow is an amazing city, and very good medical school. I would strongly advise you to apply for this school as it is internationally renowned, relatively cheap(er) compared to London, and has various things to do in the night/daytime. Cheers!

 

california

Choosing Universities- Part 1 (Norcal vs Socal)

Choosing Universities- Part 1 (North California vs South California)

“California girls, they’re undeniable, daisy dukes, bikinis on top.” Katy Perry’s voice was the soundtrack of my summer in 2013, all geared up with flip-flops and denim shorts, ready to head out to the green lands of California for my first year at UC Berkeley. The funny thing was, as a born-and-bred Malaysian, I did not realize that California is almost twice as large as the entire Malaysian Peninsula. Needless to say, I felt just a little lied to when I found out that not all of California is sunshine and rainbows. And that in fact, Northern California (NorCal), was very, VERY different from Southern California (SoCal).

Que in what felt like the most cold and miserable fall semester of my life. I ended up having to purchase a whole new wardrobe made of boots and giant coats, while my bikinis and crop-tops were left to gather dust. But once I got over the shock that California in itself feels like an entire country, I began to appreciate the differences between the two half-states.

The Bay Area, located very snuggly in NorCal, is the heart of all things technology and start-ups. Silicon Valley is home to the infamous Facebook, Google, Apple, Netflix, and almost every tech company you have heard of. Naturally, the people around this area also tend to be a generation of incredibly intelligent, creative hippies. I have seen more strangely dressed individuals in the last 3 years, than I have ever in my lifetime. If you want quirky, open, passionate, driven people to be around, NorCal is the place for you. We even have the Golden State Warriors to boast about! The more notable universities on this side of the Golden State would be Stanford and Berkeley.

SoCal on the other hand, is the kind of California that you hear in songs and see in movies. Beautiful weather all year round with gorgeous beaches and wonderful views. The people are bronzed, fit and wonderfully dressed. Here, in the heart of Los Angeles lies Hollywood, so don’t be surprised if you see famous celebrities going about their day every once in awhile. I do have to admit, being in the City of Angels sometimes felt like being back in high school where the pressure to fit in and look good was reasonably high, but the beauty of the city makes it all worth it. The University of Southern California, UCLA and Caltech are the popular universities located in SoCal.

At the end of the day, Los Angeles and San Francisco are two incredibly fantastic cities that have their own personalities, each because of their fame and size, have become representatives of SoCal and NorCal respectively. My suggestion, visit them both! Stay for a week or so and get a feel for the people and the environment. They are so different that you wouldn’t think you were in the same country, much less the same state. Either way, I love both of them and I think that most of you would too.

If you have any queries, do email us at enquiries@qconsultasia.com!

Cheers,

Fung Ying

Quintessential Consultancy

fungying

US Essays- Part 1 (Self-Reflections)

Writing College Essays: A Self-Reflection.

 

If there was one thing I learned about the college application process when I was applying to American universities, it was that everything mattered. Getting high SAT scores or a high GPA can only get you so far. It appears as though the United States wants to know more about you, the individual; not just what you are capable of academically, but also your interests and passions, your past experiences and future plans, and what you can bring to the table. In the span of two months, I had written 14 essays for 10 different colleges, all asking about my extracurricular activities, my inspirations, my life and why I had decided to pursue the course that I had chosen.

 

Writing openly has always been very easy for me, and having authored tens of thousands of words of fiction during my high school days certainly helped. It allowed me to approach the questions asked on the applications with a different and honest point of view, which I believe ended up being my saving grace. Asked about my favourite work of art, I talked about a tattoo born from difficult experiences; asked about my world, I talked about how ostracised I felt from my peers after having transferred from a local to international school. In my opinion, the college essays are an opportunity to highlight what makes you, you.

 

My advice would be this: don’t be afraid to be different, don’t be afraid to mention your past relationships, or your family difficulties, or your struggles with fitting in. The more muck and dirt you reveal about yourself in this process, the better. Because in the end, our failures play a larger part in forming our personalities than our successes. From my three years of having studied in the United States, I have come to realize that American schools really enjoy and relish in diversity: in people going against the grain, in highlighting and developing your own unique potential.

 

Methodologically I would suggest collating all your essay titles in one place. Often universities tend to ask similar questions, and this would save you the hassle of having to rewrite similar essays over and over. Do this early, so that you have the headspace to brainstorm and discuss your ideas with close friends and family. When you start writing your essays, don’t stress too hard about completing them all to perfection at once. Give yourself time to sleep on what you had written for the day, and come back to it later. The best way to overcome writer’s block is to take a break and relax, do something else that would take your mind off this stressful process. And remember, you are not likely to ever meet any of the individuals who read your essays, so bask in that freedom, have fun with it, and write!

 

If you have any queries, do email us at enquiries@qconsultasia.com!

Cheers,

Fung Ying

Quintessential Consultancy

Chem engineering

Editing Essays- Part 4 (Chem Engineering)

Chemical Engineering is a very technical and challenging course. Many famous CEOs, business leaders and Nobel Prize winners studied chemical engineering.

 

Editingchemengineering

Note the comments in  in the essay to a laymen and lack of elaboration, good opening lines. Often candidates may better their essays by reading widely on global affairs. Contact us if you want to know how this essay turned out great!

#chemenginessays #editingchemenginessays #quintessentialedu #educationconsulants #chemengineducation #futurechemengineer

 

editingppeessays

Editing Essays – Part 3 (PPE)

Said to be the university subject of future prime ministers, PPE (Politics, Philosophy, Economics) personal statements can be very daunting and demanding.

 

editingppeessays

Take a look at this great essay. Say things with conviction and elegantly illustrate your points to its core.

#ppeessays #editingppeessays #quintessentialedu #educationconsulants #ppeeducation #futureprimeminister

 

lawessays

Editing Essays – Part 2 (Law)

 

Often Law essays can be daunting. How do you show depth and breadth without sounding contrived and boring?

 

editinglawessays

Note the comments about substantiating your understanding and evolution of thoughts.

editinglawessays

Note the importance of an active voice and the importance of stating solutions and not just platitude statements.

editinglawessays

Note the importance of being specific about what you want to do and sharing deeper reflections on what your trips taught you.

#lawessays #editinglawessays #quintessentialedu #educationconsulants #laweducation

 

 

 

science student

Getting References – Part 1 (Science)

Here is a sample reference of an good student Harvard would accept:

X has been an assistant in my laboratory during the past year, and has proven to be exceptional in several respects. First, X is exceptionally intelligent. He proved to be a very quick study, learning the elements of experimental design and the uses of microcomputers in record time. Furthermore, his questions are always thoughtful and penetrating. X threw himself into his assigned projects wholeheartedly, and shows every sign of having real talent in . . . . I was a little surprised by his high degree of enthusiasm because I knew that X was not primarily interested in . . . . When I mentioned this to him, I discovered that he has well defined career goals that mesh with the projects he was working on . . . .

Second, X is exceptionally diligent and hard working. He worked many extra hours over the summer. I vividly recall coming into the lab late in the evening. . . and finding X at work. X invariably finished projects well in advance of our projected target date. X was always cheerful during this intense period, and was a joy to have in the lab.

Third, X is very good at working with other people. He is exceptionally nice and considerate and sensitive. X is not only good humored and friendly, but also is good at gauging other people’s level of knowledge and attitudes. . . .

All in all, I think X has a very bright future, and I am sure that he would benefit from . . . . Given his great intelligence and sensitivity, I am sure that he could put . . . to good use.

In short, I give X my highest recommendation, and very much hope that the committee judges his application favorably.

Source:

http://isites.harvard.edu/fs/html/icb.topic58474/Verba-recs.html